Thursday, January 22, 2009

The Zen Initiative

So, as some of you may have seen on facebook (I'm there, btw, if any of you are, too), I've just begun reading The Power of Less by Leo Babauta. I've just finished chapter one, and there are some questions I'm supposed to ask myself. In the interest in really getting some good out of this book, I thought I'd actually take the time to write down my answers (hoping I'll remember them ;o).

And here they are:

1. Which areas of my life are overwhelming?

Jokes about having five children, living in a post-consumer age overflowing with material excess, and my pack-rattiness aside . . . it's my environment. The housekeeping, meal-making & clean up, everything. (Although the laundry has been humming along since I re-did the laundry room.)

2. What would I like to simplify?

Everything about the housekeeping.

3. In addition to the tasks I need to accomplish in different areas, do I want to limit the number of possessions I have, what information I receive, or what responsibilities I have?

Overlooking the fact that the first part of this question is ambiguous to the point of complete obfuscation (too many subjective terms), this is a yes. I want to limit the number of possessions I have (which is way to many), the information I receive (I read too much on the internet), and what responsibilities I have (the kids could do a LOT more around here).

So, there's that. I'm really curious to see if the first part of question three is elucidated later in the book . . .

(Oh. I just got it. The first part of question three should have the word "limiting" right after "In addition to . . .", meaning that limiting tasks is a given. I was understanding it as "In addition to working on/completing the tasks I need to accomplish in different areas . . . " Oh intricacy, English is thy name . . . .)

1 comment:

pdxknitterati said...

It sounds like the answers are in the questions: If your children could help with the house, your life wouldn't be so overwhelming! I know, easy to say, harder to do. I have a hard time there, too. It's easier to do it myself, but I think in the long run that it's good for them to know how to do these things, and good to know that there's no magic housecleaning fairy! Along with saving *your* sanity...

good luck!